MAXIMIZING THE VALUE OF OFFSHORE AQUACULTURE DEVELOPMENT IN THE CONTEXT OF MULTIPLE OCEAN USES

Dr. Sarah Lester (SFG)

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Locating aquaculture in the open ocean—often referred to as offshore aquaculture—can mitigate many of the spatial and environmental impacts associated with more traditional land based and nearshore aquaculture practices.  Nonetheless, implementation of offshore aquaculture can be a complex and contentious process due to the wide range of uses and values in the oceans. The goal of this Sea Grant funded project is to develop a framework to inform marine spatial planning for offshore aquaculture to optimize the value and success of aquaculture development in the context of multiple ocean uses.

Publication(s):

Gentry, Rebecca R., et al. "Offshore aquaculture: Spatial planning principles for sustainable development." Ecology and Evolution (2016).

 


SNAPP: GLOBAL OFF-SHORE AQUACULTURE

SNaPP , NCEAS, TNC, WCS

Science for Nature and People (SNaPP) is a joint initiative between the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS), The Nature Conservancy (TNC), and the Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) to address global conservation and science issues with interdisciplinary and multi-institutional working groups. This year SNaPP began a collaborative analysis of global off-shore aquaculture focusing on global productions potentials and sustainable practices. This group is led by Dr. Ben Halpern.

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Urine and stool samples tested for schistosomiasis. CDC photo, Sonia Pelletreau

Urine and stool samples tested for schistosomiasis. CDC photo, Sonia Pelletreau

ECOLOGICAL SOLUTIONS FOR A HUMAN PARASITIC DISEASE IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA

Dr. Armand Kurtis (EEMB, UCSB), Dr. Lopez-Carr (Geography, UCSB), Dr. De Leo (Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford U.)

This interdisciplinary study looks at the viability and cost-effectiveness of a novel biological control approach to reduce or eliminate human schistosomiasis, a debilitating parasitic infection affecting more than 220 million people in the developing world, especially where dams and water projects have greatly expanded freshwater habitat for snails, the parasite’s intermediate hosts. The group will study the reintroduction of native crustacean predators (prawns) of snails in small aquaculture facilities, as a means to control the spread of these snails and, as a result, schistosomiasis.