Oyster_beds_Sunset-1024x669.jpg
floatingPens.jpg
malaysiaAq.JPG
TunaPen.jpg
Oyster_beds_Sunset-1024x669.jpg

About Aquaculture


The farming of fish and other water dwelling species dates back to ancient Chinese and Egyptian civilizations. Although these same techniques have persisted over the years, abundant availability of wild species have kept aquaculture practices at relatively small scales. As the human population continues to increase, the wild sources of these species are becoming depleted and aquaculture is stepping in to fill the demand. This rapid expansion of aquaculture has brought to light a number of drawbacks, which require stronger understanding of the relationships between aquaculture systems and social and natural ecosystems.

SCROLL DOWN

About Aquaculture


The farming of fish and other water dwelling species dates back to ancient Chinese and Egyptian civilizations. Although these same techniques have persisted over the years, abundant availability of wild species have kept aquaculture practices at relatively small scales. As the human population continues to increase, the wild sources of these species are becoming depleted and aquaculture is stepping in to fill the demand. This rapid expansion of aquaculture has brought to light a number of drawbacks, which require stronger understanding of the relationships between aquaculture systems and social and natural ecosystems.

Key species:

floatingPens.jpg

Costs & Benefits


As with any growing or new technology there are benefits and risks to aquaculture, especially mariculture, farming in the ocean. Collaborative research and intimate relationships between industry, regulation and academia will help ensure safe and efficient expansion. Here we detail some of the pros and cons of aquaculture, each is relevant to varying degrees based on species farmed, geographic location and the intensity of farming.

Costs & Benefits


As with any growing or new technology there are benefits and risks to aquaculture, especially mariculture, farming in the ocean. Collaborative research and intimate relationships between industry, regulation and academia will help ensure safe and efficient expansion. Here we detail some of the pros and cons of aquaculture, each is relevant to varying degrees based on species farmed, geographic location and the intensity of farming.

Benefits

  • ALTERNATIVE/ADDITIONAL PROTEIN SOURCE

  • RELIEVE PRESSURE ON WILD STOCKS

  • STABLE, NUTRITIOUS FOOD SOURCE

  • STABLE INCOME SOURCe


Costs

  • POLLUTION

  • HABITAT DESTRUCTION

  • FEED INPUTS

  • DISEASE & PARASITE transmission

  • LAND USE

  • FRESHWATER RESOURCEs

malaysiaAq.JPG

Community Aquaculture


Local farming to promote food security and economic stability in coastal communities

Community Aquaculture


Local farming to promote food security and economic stability in coastal communities

Many coastal communities depend on aquaculture for food and income using it to replace or supplement traditional artisanal fishing practices. Aquaculture at this scale can provide local communities with a consistent source of protein and relieve pressure on local fisheries and marine ecosystems. Community aquaculture usually occurs close to shore or on land in coastal ponds. Effort tends to be lower including basic technologies and little to no feed requirements.

Asian and African societies have been farming fish for centuries employing complex multi-trophic systems in order to maximize the benefits of their efforts. As an example, some Chinese villages would grow various species of Carp in flooded rice fields to concurrently fertilize the fields and provide nutrients for fish. Even before this, the Egyptians used similar mixed agricultural designs in their farming.

TunaPen.jpg

Industrial Aquaculture


Large-scale intensive aquaculture for profit benefiting companies 

Industrial Aquaculture


Large-scale intensive aquaculture for profit benefiting companies 

Fish farming at the industrial scale has been growing as more fish stocks become depleted. Some fish are farmed at an industrial level because production costs are low or market values are high. Due to the high costs of feeds, especially for carnivorous species, industrial aquaculture has been dominated by filter feeding and grazer species. As wild stocks of high value carnivorous species (such as salmon, shrimp and tuna) continue to fall, farming these species to meet increasing demand is becoming more profitable.